Sunday, January 15, 2012

Windows Phone 7? 5 Reasons Why I Have no Faith in it


In my last and final goodbye to Nokia, a commeter asked the question, "what about Windows Phone 7?" Indeed, all throughout the post, there was not one mention of Microsoft's answer to both Android and iOS. Is it because I think WP7 is no match for the two dominant OSs? Or that because it's from Microsoft? I don't think so. WP7 for me, is not a viable contender for the following reasons


1. Lateness: I really don't know what Redmond was doing when Google bought Android Inc back in 2005 or when Steve Jobs introduced the iPhone back in 2007, but somehow they chose to turn a blind eye to the then budding ultra smartphone market and instead concentrate more on their desktop offering. As the adage goes, the early bird catches the worm, and both Google and Apple were those early birds. If Redmond had thrown down its gauntlet at that time with the introduction of WP7 then, at least they would stand a chance today.


2. Miscrosoft bullying: Rather than focus time and resources on marketing and making WP7 attractive to both developers and those who don't want either iOS or Android, Microsoft prefers to spend its energy on  bullying Android OEMs into paying so called royalties for infringing never-shown Microsoft patents. But there's no surprise here, it's one of Microsoft's hallmarks to use the bogus patent system as a trump card if it cannot compete. 


3. Nokia: Perhaps the biggest reason why WP7 will find it tough on the market is the unholy alliance with Nokia. For years, Nokia had been a company known to make profits by selling high volume, low cost "dumb" phones to hundreds of millions of people across the world. Now with WP7, it will have to focus on the highend spectrum of the market. With Elop giving Symbian just a few years more for "harvesting," Nokia is left with WP7 as its primary OS. We don't know when Meltemi will finally take the place of Symbian, but for now, we can safely assume Nokia is going to alienate its core market. 


To also hammer home the point of Nokia being a disaster for WP7, take a look at the press coverage the release of the N9 and N950 MeeGo powered devices enjoyed and compare them to the Nokia Lumia, even Engadget, an ultra Apple centric blog was drooling over the N9. The Lumia? Yawn. The market logically expected Nokia to overhaul Symbian and fire up MeeGo, not sell out to Redmond.


4. Apps, apps and apps: The Apple App Store and Android Markets both have hundreds of thousands of apps available for download. Think of anything and you're likely to find an app for that in those two markets. WP7 is yet to catch up, and with Microsoft busily suing other OEMs rather than go all out to attract developers, it's going to take an eternity for WP7 to reach the scale of Android and iOS in terms of apps. 


5. The OEMs just love Android: Why? Because it gives them the power to differentiate themselves completely from their competitors. Given its open nature, it is always easy and safe to model Android into anything one can think of, an example being what Amazon did with it on its Kindle Fire tablets. Which company would not love such an offering? It's little wonder that even the home pages of almost all the device makers  readily feature Android phones, with WP7 a few clicks down the menu. I don't know the extent of customization Microsoft allows the OEMs, but it sure will not be on the scale Google gives them with Android. 


There could be even more reasons why it's going to be a monumentous act for WP7 to climb out of the bottom, but from where I sit, these are the 5 basic reasons I see which work well against Microsoft's comeback in the mobile spectrum.

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By Seeraj Muneer with No comments

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